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DEV RES V: Music Is Sport // Dissolutions

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5:15pm - Music Is Sport

Atienne Bakker - guitar and musical direction
Stephen Magnusson - guitar
Holly Moore - saxophone
Maria Moles - drums

This project is built on integrating several interdisciplinary and conceptual subjects in order to create a new and unique form of performance and experience. Firstly it combines the traditionally separate fields of sports and music, secondly it combines electronic improvisation with acoustic improvisation, and finally it aims to combine musical improvisation with visual improvisation. Throughout the residency these concepts will be combined with the aim of creating a cyclic performance method in the final concert. This cyclic performance works because the elements are designed to influence to each other in during the process of their creation.

 

Performance 1: Football
The first performance is most traditional performance of the three. Using acoustic instruments to improvise whilst reacting to visual cues from sporting events. The cues may initiate the playing of pre-composed material. If possible the video reactions will be limited to occurring from direct audio which will alter two potential clips to be blended with each other and altered based on sound. The first sport will be football.

Performance 2: Boxing
The second concert will use electronic instruments which will be more directly mapped to the visual component; the signals used to create sound will alter the video parameters such as RGB, image position, pixilation, etc. The second sport will be boxing.

Performance 3: Chess
The final performance will be using live footage of a chess game being performed in the room itself. Live footage will be altered by both electronic instruments and acoustic instruments. The influence of the music and visuals has potential to influence the game itself creating an entire loop of sport and sound.

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6:15pm - Dissolutions

Timothy Franklin - saxophone and musical direction
Joe O'Connor - piano
Isaac Gunnoo - double bass
Hugh Harvey - drums

This project aims to develop ground first broken by Keith Jarrett’s European quartet in the mid 1970’s. The ensemble aims to marry the thematic, harmonic, and melodic sensibilities of music of the European art music tradition with free improvisation and the rhythmic and textural approach of the jazz tradition.

Performance 1: ‘Chamber Jazz’ Quartet
This performance will present a number of short pieces utilising a modern jazz style and formal structures. Thematic material will draw on classical gestures and contemporary harmony. See Theme and Variations, and The Declaration within the accompanying playlist for early examples of this concept. 
The ensemble will consist of saxophone (likely the rarely heard tenor in C), piano, bass, and drums.

Performance 2: The Suite.
Performance 2 will further develop the concepts explored in performance 1, but will take a more formally ambitious approach. The performance will see the premiere of a new work written specifically for the occasion. This work will take the form of a longer suite consisting of several connected movements loosely grounded in the baroque suite, and utilising contemporary classical harmony. The heavy improvisatorial focus of the earlier performance will be retained, but the formal context will be further removed from those commonly used within the jazz tradition. ‘Echo’, within the accompanying playlist, provides some insight into what is intended.
Again the ensemble will consist of a saxophone-led quartet.

Performance 3: Counterpoint
Performance 3 will utilise the larger and somewhat unconventional ensemble of saxophone, bass clarinet, alto flute, viola, cello, and rhythm section. This ensemble will enable exploration of textural and contrapuntal ideas within an interactive improvising ensemble. The new works to be played at this performance will attempt to weave a line between group improvisation, intricate counterpoint, and organic formal structures, and will showcase the unusual textures possible with this diverse and flexible instrumentation.

[ Photo credit: Cameron Jamieson Photography ]